FLU SHOTS AND CLINICS SCHEDULED

 

FLU SHOTS ARE AVAILABLE NOW!!! CLINICS ARE SCHEDULED AS:

WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 6TH 9AM TO 11:30PM AT ELLINGTON SENIOR CENTER & ELLINGTON SENIOR HOUSING 1PM TO 2:30PM

WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 27TH 1PM TO 3PM AT THE BUNKER FIREHOUSE/COMMUNITY CENTER

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 4TH 9AM TO 11AM AT THE LESTERVILLE LIBRARY AND 1PM TO 5PM AT THE REYNOLDS COUNTY HEALTH CENTER IN CENTERVILLE

YOU CAN COME TO THE HEALTH CENTER ANY TIME IN BETWEEN THOSE DATES/TIMES BUT WE RECOMMEND YOU CALL FIRST TO MAKE SURE A NURSE IS AVAILABLE. 573-648-2498 OR TOLL FREE 866-579-3861 

We accept AARP Secure Horizons, Aetna, Anthem (Not Medicare Advantage), Blue Cross/Blue Shield, Care Improvement Plus, Cigna, Coventry, Golden Rule, HealthLink, Humana, Medicare B, Medicare Railroad, Three Rivers, Tricare/UHC Military West, United Health Care & UMWA. PLEASE KNOW THAT CARE MANAGEMENT PLUS CARD WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED. THEY ARE A MANAGED CARE PHARMACY INSURANCE THAT IS NOT PART OF THE MEDICARE PART B PLAN WE ACCEPT.

SELF PAY FLU SHOTS ARE $20. WE HAVE KEPT THIS PRICE FOR MANY YEARS NOW EVEN THOUGH THE COST OF VACCINE HAS INCREASED.

YOU MUST BRING YOUR INSURANCE CARDS WITH YOU.

Influenza (the flu) is a serious disease that can lead to hospitalization and sometimes even death. Anyone can get sick from the flu. While flu can make anyone sick, certain people are at greater risk for serious complications from the flu, causing hospitalization or even death, such as:
  • older people
  • young children
  • people with chronic lung disease (such as asthma and COPD), diabetes (type 1 and 2), heart disease, neurologic conditions, and certain other long term health conditions, and
  • pregnant women

Flu viruses are constantly changing. Each flu season, different flu viruses can spread, and they can affect people differently based on their body's ability to fight infection. Even healthy children and adults can get very sick from the flu and spread it to family and friends.

Flu seasons are unpredictable and can be severe. Studies going back 30 years to 1976 show that seasonal flu-related deaths have ranged from about 3,000 people to 49,000 people. In the United States, thousands of healthy adults and children have to visit the doctor or are hospitalized from flu complications each year. Flu vaccination can protect you and your family from the flu and its complications. Last flu season (2009 - 2010) is an example of how unpredictable flu can be.  The 2009 H1N1 virus that caused a lot of illness was more serious for younger people than seasonal flu usually is.The first and most important step in protecting against the flu is to get a flu vaccine each season. CDC recommends a three step approach to fighting flu: vaccination, everyday preventive actions and the correct use of antiviral drugs if your doctor recommends them.

Everyone 6 months of age and older is recommended to be vaccinated against influenza. Getting a flu vaccine is easy, and it is the single best way to protect yourself and your loved ones from flu. Get vaccinated as soon as vaccine becomes available in your community. The flu vaccine provides protection that lasts through the flu season. The flu vaccine is updated each season to protect against three flu viruses that research indicates will cause the most illness. Because flu viruses are always changing, last season's flu vaccine may not protect against newer viruses, and annual vaccination is the only way to maintain protection each season. 

Protect your family from the flu by getting yourself vaccinated. A flu vaccine reduces your risk of illness, hospitalization, or even death and can prevent you spreading the virus to your loved ones. Health experts now recommend that all people 6 months  of age and older get a flu vaccine every flu season.

The flu shot (also called inactivated influenza vaccine) cannot give you the flu. It is comprised of killed viruses. Most people generally do not experience any side effects from the flu shot. When they do occur, they are usually mild. The most common side effects from the flu shot, including the shot made to protect against the H1N1 virus last season, ARE soreness, redness, tenderness or swelling where the shot is given.

Flu can spread rapidly in health care settings. Vaccination is the first and most important step physicians, health care workers, and vulnerable patients can take to protect against the flu. Health care workers should get a seasonal flu vaccine every year because flu viruses change yearly and a flu vaccine from a previous year may not protect against the current flu viruses.

Flu shots are safe for pregnant women and their unborn babies. The shot has been recommended for pregnant women for years. The flu vaccine can be given after the first 3 months of pregnancy. The flu shot is safe for women who plan to breastfeed and the vaccine can be given to mothers who are breastfeeding.

 
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